Tag Archives: memory

Memory, in which I'll tell you…wait, what was I going to say?

I’m watching the quiz show JEOPARDY! earlier this year, and the category for the final was MUSICAL THEATRE: “Before this show hit Broadway in 1964, one of its working titles was ‘The Luckiest People'”. I knew the song to which the clue referred was was People. I knew Barbra Streisand was in the subsequent movie. But could I remember the name of the musical/movie? I could not; the answer, of course, was Funny Girl.

I was SO annoyed with myself. I don’t mind being unfamiliar with information, but I HATE it Continue reading Memory, in which I'll tell you…wait, what was I going to say?

O is for Olympic Observations

I’ve watched a lot of Olympic Games over the years. Somehow, though, they are starting to run together in my mind. What year was it that Sarah Hughes won the women’s figure skating finals, after being in fourth place after the short program? It was 2002, but I couldn’t have told you this without looking it up.

So here are my now fading recollections, without checking sources except to verify that my memory was in fact correct.

1896 Summer: Athens, Greece – obviously, I don’t remember the specific event – how old do you think I am? – but I do recall that this was the beginning of the modern Games
1904 Summer: St. Louis, MO, United States – the debacle that Shooting Parrots mentioned
1936 Summer: Berlin, Germany – this will always be the Jesse Owens (pictured) Olympics for me, with Hitler’s assertion of a master race being shattered
1948 Summer: London, United Kingdom – I must admit that I learned much about the still bombed out city holding the first summer Games since the end of World War II from NBC’s coverage of the 2012 Games

1960 Winter: Squaw Valley, CA, United States – I don’t specifically remember these games Continue reading O is for Olympic Observations

B is for Brain Blips


A couple months ago, I came across this interview of Barbara Strauch, author of “The Secret Life of the Grown-up Brain: The Surprising Talent of the Middle-Aged Mind.”

This paragraph jumped out at me: “Strauch notes that people in midlife start experiencing more brain blips. She opens the book in her basement, pondering what she went there for. She asks around, and finds that her middle-aged acquaintances have similar zone-outs.”

I so recognize this. Oh, and this: “Names in particular are easy to forget if all we’ve learned is the sound. The more context we have — the more ways something is cross-referenced in our memory banks — the better chance we have of excavating it from storage.”

When we were children, my sisters and I used to razz my grandmother for saying things like, “Oh, that’s the old [such and so] building.” It had never been called that in OUR lifetimes; why couldn’t she call it what it’s called now?

Move forward 40 years. I seriously can’t remember Continue reading B is for Brain Blips